CSAR

CSAR

Center for the Study of Affect Regulation

14

May'17

Welcome to CSAR

Welcome to CSAR — an educational resource for clinicians interested in learning and deepening their understanding of affect regulation theory and its applications. Along with content directly about affect regulation theory, we will cover the fields that contribute to it; attachment theory, interpersonal neurobiology, traumatology, dissociative studies, psychoanalysis and mother-infant studies.

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14

May'17

What Are We Talking About When We Talk About Dissociation?

Confused about what people mean when they use the word ‘dissociation’? You’re not alone. Dell (2009) notes that the definition of dissociation “has never suffered from clarity.” Clinicians use the same term to refer to a bewildering array of disparate phenomena.

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30

Apr'17

How We Know We Are Known

Attunement is a word routinely used by psychotherapists and often parents as well. But as we talk about 'attuning,' we rarely ask: “What is ‘attunement'"? How can we human beings ‘tell’ intuitively that we are being ‘met’ or ‘gotten’ by others?

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16

Apr'17

Groucho Marx Said It First
Splitting as an Evolutionarily Adaptive Phenomenon

“Who ya gonna believe, me or your own eyes?”( Marx Brothers film, Duck Soup, 1933). “Who are you going to trust, me or your lying eyes?” (Richard Pryor, Live on the Sunset Strip, 1982). And from Dan Jenkins’ book, Life Its Ownself (1984), when the husband catches his wife in a meet-up with her lover at a Friday night Texas high school football game, and her protective girlfriend, standing guard at the Ladies room into which wife has fled, yells helpfully …

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02

Apr'17

Impermanence
and the Task of Psychoanalysis

Shortly after Donald Trump was elected President of the United States I received an email with a quotation from the Dalai Lama about the wisdom of the perception of impermanence. I cannot find the exact quote. It’s possible I made it up. Was the Dalai Lama (or my unconscious) trying to calm me with the idea that “this, too, shall pass”?

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17

Mar'17

Body to Body Communication in Couple Therapy

Nell and Harry had been married for five years, and in “talk therapy” (their words) for three years. They came to me for consultation at the suggestion of their frustrated therapist who said she had exhausted her toolbox with this volatile couple. Both therapist and clients reported that their attempts to avoid the “blow ups” that happened sometimes several times a day had failed. Husband and wife were prone to blaming each other. The plan they had agreed to follow in therapy when they started to fight (such as “Take 5” or “Count to 10 before speaking”) was typically used by one against the other. . .

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