CSAR

Guest Blogger

17

Mar'17

Body to Body Communication in Couple Therapy

Nell and Harry had been married for five years, and in “talk therapy” (their words) for three years. They came to me for consultation at the suggestion of their frustrated therapist who said she had exhausted her toolbox with this volatile couple. Both therapist and clients reported that their attempts to avoid the “blow ups” that happened sometimes several times a day had failed. Husband and wife were prone to blaming each other. The plan they had agreed to follow in therapy when they started to fight (such as “Take 5” or “Count to 10 before speaking”) was typically used by one against the other. . .

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25

Feb'17

Focused Illusions

Recently I saw the film Now You See Me 2 and found myself focused more on the power of illusion then the high intensity good guy/bad guy plot. In this movie, the characters are master Robin Hood magicians consciously trained to build illusions, so that at first it is quite difficult to assess who’s on what side (unless you saw Now You See Me 1, which I hadn't).

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10

Feb'17

Cause or Effect?
How Best to Define Trauma

Popular culture tends to define trauma as “being the victim of harm,” and sees trauma as being located in the harmful experiences themselves. But is this the best way to define trauma? If we are trying to stem the tide of trauma, then we do indeed need to focus on harmful experiences in order to see how we might prevent them from happening in the future. However, if our aim is emotional healing, then we’d be wise to stick more closely to the dictionary. The dictionary defines ‘trauma’ as a wound, shock or injury; in so doing, it locates trauma in the impact made by negative experiences, rather than in the experiences themselves.

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29

Jan'17

The Spectral Fingerprint of Attunement

In her entertainingly brilliant 2007 TED talk, How to Truly Listen, profoundly deaf percussionist Evelyn Glennie explains that to truly listen, we must use our bodies as resonating chambers.* Regardless of any learned skill or innate talent in listening, our bodies actually are resonating chambers, whether we knowingly use them that way or not. In essence, we are always listening and always knowing in a felt sense sort of way.

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29

Jan'17

Affect Regulation in the Supervisory Relationship
An Experiential Dynamic Approach

Affect regulation refers to the ability to maintain or increase positive feelings and well-being and to minimize or regulate stress feelings and defensive states. Here I want to focus on affect regulation in the supervisory relationship. First, let me introduce myself to you: I am an AEDP therapist and supervisor; the theory and practice of AEDP inform this blog.

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15

Jan'17

The Prenatal Origins of Development and Experience Over the Life Span

We are all survivors of our prenatal and birth experiences. Being alive now is evidence that enough resources were available (whether an abundance or only the bare minimum) to enable us to survive this earliest period of our development.

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