CSAR

Guest Blogger

10

Feb'17

Cause or Effect?
How Best to Define Trauma

Popular culture tends to define trauma as “being the victim of harm,” and sees trauma as being located in the harmful experiences themselves. But is this the best way to define trauma? If we are trying to stem the tide of trauma, then we do indeed need to focus on harmful experiences in order to see how we might prevent them from happening in the future. However, if our aim is emotional healing, then we’d be wise to stick more closely to the dictionary. The dictionary defines ‘trauma’ as a wound, shock or injury; in so doing, it locates trauma in the impact made by negative experiences, rather than in the experiences themselves.

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29

Jan'17

The Spectral Fingerprint of Attunement

In her entertainingly brilliant 2007 TED talk, How to Truly Listen, profoundly deaf percussionist Evelyn Glennie explains that to truly listen, we must use our bodies as resonating chambers.* Regardless of any learned skill or innate talent in listening, our bodies actually are resonating chambers, whether we knowingly use them that way or not. In essence, we are always listening and always knowing in a felt sense sort of way.

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29

Jan'17

Affect Regulation in the Supervisory Relationship
An Experiential Dynamic Approach

Affect regulation refers to the ability to maintain or increase positive feelings and well-being and to minimize or regulate stress feelings and defensive states. Here I want to focus on affect regulation in the supervisory relationship. First, let me introduce myself to you: I am an AEDP therapist and supervisor; the theory and practice of AEDP inform this blog.

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15

Jan'17

The Prenatal Origins of Development and Experience Over the Life Span

We are all survivors of our prenatal and birth experiences. Being alive now is evidence that enough resources were available (whether an abundance or only the bare minimum) to enable us to survive this earliest period of our development.

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31

Dec'16

The Untreatable Couple?
Misfires and Arousal Dysregulation in Couple Therapy

Perhaps the most important area of co-regulation is a couple’s ability to relieve distress. Couples who are unable to quickly attenuate and foreshorten distress states are in danger of amplifying threats. Threat states can come about when partners have sustained and repeated bouts of misattuned moments, wherein they are unable to error correct or repair breaches in the intersubjective field.

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18

Dec'16

Learning to Regulate Fear

In the relatively safe space of the consulting room, two-thirds of my adult patients are learning to regulate fear. Fear—ranging from chronic generalized anxiety to a state of chronic fearful hypervigilance, often verging on panic—that they have been living with every day since early childhood. All are high-functioning, productive, and living in relatively safe surroundings. All consulted me with somatic pain symptoms. Many were surprised to discover that they had been living in fear since childhood.

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