CSAR

Guest Blogger

18

Dec'16

Learning to Regulate Fear

In the relatively safe space of the consulting room, two-thirds of my adult patients are learning to regulate fear. Fear—ranging from chronic generalized anxiety to a state of chronic fearful hypervigilance, often verging on panic—that they have been living with every day since early childhood. All are high-functioning, productive, and living in relatively safe surroundings. All consulted me with somatic pain symptoms. Many were surprised to discover that they had been living in fear since childhood.

Read More

04

Dec'16

Remembering to Forget

As I arc toward the apex of life, I find myself more and more fascinated with the topic of memory. I don’t conjure up names so well, although truth be told, I was never very good at conjuring up names, especially compared with facts.

Read More

14

Nov'16

Why are we not better at regulating our self-states?

Paradoxically, in spite of craving the experience of wellbeing, too often it eludes us. This is especially so when we need it most, in situations of emotional or interpersonal stress. More significant still, is the distressing experience of dysregulated feelings even when there’s no real threat to our wellbeing.

Read More

31

Oct'16

Catastrophic Shame and the Reorganization of Self

Some years ago I sat with other attending clinicians in the tiny, one-window office of Joan Turkus, then medical director of “The Center” at the Psychiatric Institute of Washington, lamenting the density and intractability of shame in our chronically traumatized patients. The gist was, in essence, a plea: “How in the world can we make any headway with shame that seems more like solidified glue than a feeling?” And it wasn’t that our patients didn’t know about the hardened molasses …

Read More

31

Oct'16

Grief, Loss, and the Body

We all have a tendency to talk about our “feelings” as if human emotions were a separate stream of information carried by a different pipeline. But our feelings are inextricably entangled with the words we use to describe them, our beliefs about what emotions mean, and all the body sensations and reactions that feelings generate and that in turn evoke more emotions. As Damasio reminds us in The Feeling of What Happens, “All emotions have the body as their theatre.”

Read More
© 2017 CSAR - Center for the Study of Affect Regulation All rights reserved.
Skip to toolbar