CSAR

Regulation Theory

  • Affect regulation theory. A clinical model. Chapter 1
  • In Chapter 1 of Dr. Hill’s book Affect Regulation Theory: a Clinical Model he presents classic attachment theory. The Strange Situation and Adult Attachment interview are described along with the concepts of secure and insecure (avoidant, preoccupied and disorganized) attachment patterns. Additionally the reader is introduced to how each of the insecure patterns represent different deficits in affect regulating capacity in comparison to the robust affect tolerance and resiliency of secure attachment....

  • Affect regulation theory. A clinical model. Chapter 2: Self-states
  • In Chapter 2 of Dr. Hill’s book Affect Regulation Theory: a Clinical Model he presents a model of bodymind organized around the relational theory of self states. The central idea is that when regulated self states are integrated and when dysregulated self states are dissociated. Self states are conceived as assemblages of perceptual, attentional, representational, memory and reflective systems. Each system may be integrated or dissociated. Additionally, two types of dissociation – compartmentalization and altered states of consciousness are discussed....

  • Affect regulation theory. A clinical model. Chapter 3: Neurobiology of the primary affect-regulating system.
  • In Chapter 3 of Dr. Hill’s book Affect Regulation Theory: a Clinical Model he presents the neurobiological substrate of the primary affect regulating system. The components of the limbic system (amygdala, insula, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex are discussed. Additionally the relationship between the limbic system, HPA axis, and autonomic nervous systems are outlined. Each is involved in the assessment of internal and external stimuli and in the automatic regulation of affect....

  • Affect regulation theory. A clinical model. Chapter 4: Right brain, implicit processes and implicit self
  • In Chapter 4 of Dr. Hill’s book Affect Regulation Theory: a Clinical Model he presents a model of the right brain understood to be the seat of the “Implicit self”; i.e. the unconscious processes that assess and respond involuntarily to internal and external events. Comparisons are made to the explicit processes mediated by the left brain. These processes include implicit vs explicit memory, implicit cognition and implicit communication. Together they comprise the implicit (unconscious) self....

  • Playing on the Right Side of the Brain: An Interview with Allan N. Schore
  • An extraordinary interview with Allan Schore where among other things he discusses the personal origins of his theory how it came out of his own play. There are no CE credits for this. Think of it as play. It’s one of the most interesting interviews of Schore that I’ve seen. I wish to thank the American Journal of Play for allowing us to publish this extraordinary interview. ...

  • Modern attachment theory: the enduring impact of early right-brain development
  • Dr. Schore centers his talk on the importance of the early right brain development for the future functioning and well-being of a person. He describes a shift in science that currently gives emotions and to the regulation of emotions a privileged place. The attunement and co-regulation in the relationship between the mother and the baby has a fundamental impact on the regulation of emotions. Current research shows that emotional dysregulation and problems in the right brain are present in every pathology. ...

Search for Articles and Tests

Recent Posts

  • Welcome to CSAR

    Welcome to CSAR

    Welcome to CSAR — an educational resource for clinicians interested in learning and deepening their understanding of affect regulation theory …Read More »
  • Affect Regulation, Recognition, and Mutuality

    Affect Regulation, Recognition, and Mutuality

    We may imagine the psychological position of the Third originating in the mutual accommodation, the system of adaptation and fitting …Read More »
  • Sex for Affect Regulation

    Sex for Affect Regulation

    For those who struggle with addiction, factors including genetics, epigenetics, and the interuterine environment contribute to their developing this sorry …Read More »
© 2017 CSAR - Center for the Study of Affect Regulation All rights reserved.
Skip to toolbar