CSAR

CSAR

Center for the Study of Affect Regulation

03

Dec'17

Welcome to CSAR

Welcome to CSAR — an educational resource for clinicians interested in learning and deepening their understanding of affect regulation theory and its applications. Along with content directly about affect regulation theory, we will cover the fields that contribute to it; attachment theory, interpersonal neurobiology, traumatology, dissociative studies, psychoanalysis and mother-infant studies.

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02

Dec'17

The Power of Preying
Why Men Target Women in the Workplace

The recent firestorm of allegations made by several female actors of unwanted sexual advances and rape seems to have exposed yet another powerful man, Harvey Weinstein, as a sexual predator. Weinstein’s predation, like that of his counterparts Bill Cosby, Louis CK and Anthony Weiner, appears to have been fully calculated.

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19

Nov'17

What Is Freedom?

As often happens via social media, a stimulating quote by Buddhist teacher Ken McLeod found its way into my email box:   “What is freedom? It is the moment-by-moment experience of not being run by one’s own reactive mechanisms.”

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05

Nov'17

The Process of Resilience
Part 1: Being on Behalf of the Self

I want to lay out what I mean by resilience and how I think it can and should be a more useful and subtle concept for clinicians than it traditionally is. I want also to link different manifestations of resilience to the range of affect regulating capacities that people may or may not possess.

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20

Oct'17

What Is Trauma?
Trauma and Dissociation

Statistics and common experience tell us that exposure to trauma is common to human beings. , to greater and lesser extents. But what is it that is being measured and experienced? Trauma is an event or experience that overwhelms the frameworks of the mind

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06

Oct'17

Resonance and Synchrony
The Two Moons of Attunement

A decade of research focused on the neurobiology of attachment clearly shows that primary caregivers regulate their children’s affect, which in turn connects and organizes the neural networks in the brain, thus affecting the child's future ability to be emotionally self-regulated.

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